Sally Hansen, the woman herself. Via sallyhansen.com

Sally Hansen: A Life Revealed

 

I’ve long wondered about the mysterious woman named Sally Hansen whose name is used by ubiquitous drugstore nail polish brand. I’d assumed the company had been started by a Sally Hansen, but there was never any information about her online, even on Sally Hansen’s official site. There were even tidbits online mentioning that such a person never existed.

Now, I can only assume that the good folks over at Sally Hansen were just as curious as I was, because “[i]n 2014, a team of investigative journalists was hired to uncover the truth. And after months of failed leads…her story is finally ready to tell.” (sallyhansen.com)

Late last year, Sally Hansen updated us all with the story.

The mysterious first lady of drugstore nail polish is revealed to be Sally Genevieve Hansen (née Finney) of Kansas, born to a couple who also happened to own a small cosmetics company.

As a young woman, she moved to Hollywood, where she worked as an actress and a dancer, and wrote a column for the Los Angeles Times on the side. Later, she moved back to Kansas and helped her family to expand their company. This success led to additional cosmetics work with a department store, S. H. Kress & Co., and eventually Hansen moved to New York City, where started her own eponymous beauty company in 1946. The famous “Hard As Nails” line was one of her company’s first trademarks. She sold Sally Hansen Inc. in 1962, and sadly, passed away a year later.

You can read more about her here:

 

I love learning bits of nail polish history!

Happy reading!

[Image: sallyhansen.com]

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Cutex Care + Color Nail Color in Blues Fest, swatch

Cutex — Blues Fest (Care + Color Nail Color) Swatch & Review

Collection: Cutex 2017 Spring, Care + Color Nail Color [Launch]

When Revlon—who also own SinfulColors—acquired classic nail brand Cutex from Coty late last year, it was only a matter of time that new nail colors would be released.

Cutex the brand dates back to 1911, when it was founded in Stamford, CT, USA.

Nowadays, Cutex is best known for its nail polish remover, but it’s had a long history of producing nail polish, too. In the company’s first few years, it developed a liquid nail polish based on auto paint. Prior to this, nail color generally came in powders and pastes; by 1925, virtually all nail polish sold had taken on liquid form. Three years later, Cutex started to sell acetone polish remover, and the rest is history.

Cutex vintage gold nail polish

Cutex vintage gold nail polish.
Faaaaancy!

Cutex vintage nail polish ad

Cutex vintage cosmetic ad.
They made lipstick, too!

Cutex vintage nail polish ad

Cutex vintage nail polish ad.
Check out the Art Deco styling. Circa 1920s? Depression era?

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Urban Decay Nail Enamel in Sin, swatch

Throwback Thursday! Urban Decay — Sin (Nail Enamel) Swatch & Review

Brand: Urban Decay

Finally this week, after posting about my Ipsy bag, doing a rare Award/Tag, and sharing my Sephora sale haul, I’ve got a nail polish for you all!

For Throwback Thursday today, I have quite an oldie! Urban Decay got their start with unusual shades of eyeshadow, lipstick, and nail polish. This particular polish is from their second revamp (c. early 2000s, maybe?) of their nail polish line, and it was simply called Nail Enamel, like the original.

The bottle was pretty similar to the first style, except the cap was changed to look a little less industrial and a little more luxe.

Urban Decay nail polish history: Curfew, Sin, Gash

Urban Decay nail polish history: Curfew, Sin, Gash

I was glad for the change, even though the new polishes contained 50% less product, because the original bottle caps were plain awful. They were awkwardly small to hold while polishing, and they never screwed on tightly enough so all of my original polishes dried out long ago (as you can see with my bottle of Curfew, above).

(Note how the bottles look progressively bigger, but the volume actually decreases! Ah, marketing.)

The new bottle was discontinued some time ago, though Urban Decay have occasionally reintroduced nail polish here and there as special editions. More recently, they’ve introduced more polish in nude (“Naked”) shades to go with their immensely popular Naked eyeshadow palettes, and they reissued some of their original colors, too. Despite the stupidly high Canadian price (C$18, the hell?!) I had to pick up Gash when UD ran a sale, since it’s one of my favorite red shimmers from back in the day! My original bottle, of course, dried out.

Sin is a pretty nude beige with a lot of silvery shimmer. Definitely one of the more conservative Urban Decay shades! It’s also one of UD’s most popular, as it still exists in eyeshadow form.

Urban Decay Nail Enamel in Sin

Urban Decay Nail Enamel in Sin

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Article: “A mix of luck, polish” (LA Times)

I’d previously read something about the preponderance of Vietnamese-Americans in the nail salon business, but I hadn’t come across the role of actress Tippi Hedren (The Birds) in it, as well.

Here is a fascinating read on a part of nail polish history!

The story of how the Vietnamese fell into the nail industry is one of pure chance — of how 20 women who fled their war-torn country happened to meet a Hollywood starlet with beautiful nails.

A mix of luck, polish – latimes